Two sacred routines you must set up to get organized in your business

Two sacred routines you must set up to get organized in your business

How are you spending time on your business? Two hours each week is often all you need to make a huge leap.

Friday and Sunday are two of my favorite days of the week. For me, they are sacred days where I devote my attention to check in on the progress and growth of my business. When I skip or flake on these weekly appointments in my business, it just doesn’t work as well.

Today, I’m sharing my two sacred routines that I do in my business and how I use it to bring more structure and organization in my work.

Read More

How to Deal With Fear of Putting Yourself Out There

How to Deal With Fear of Putting Yourself Out There

As social creatures, we constantly crave validation and to feel that what we do matters. We want to be socially accepted and feel that we belong. It’s a human need and no one is immune to criticism no matter how thick your skin is. We are hardwired to blend in. It’s the reason why marketing is so hard for a lot of us because it requires bringing a level of visibility to you and your work that oftentimes makes us uncomfortable.

The way out is through 4 ways of willingness.

Read More

If She Can Do It: Client Case Study Series with Lauren Harvey

If She Can Do It: Client Case Study Series with Lauren Harvey

I was thrilled to work with Lauren Harvey as she navigated a truly toxic work situation and get the creative courage and inspiration to build and grow a thriving graphic design business where she gets to work with innovative, thought leading brands doing what she loves. Read on to learn how she did it and her best advice for those wanting to take the leap and create a thriving business. Enjoy!

Read More

Should You Write Newsletters? Yes. And Here's How.

First off, what is a newsletter?

A newsletter is a marketing tool businesses use to engage their customers. It involves sending out informational newsletters to interested parties. There are two different kinds of newsletters: those that are sent through traditional mail and those sent digitally via email. As you probably already know (because you’re not an idiot), email is a cheaper, faster way to send communications. It gives you instant and easy access to data that can be studied so that you can learn over time about your audience and readers.

What is typically in a newsletter?

Newsletters can contain a range of topics. It can include industry news, promotions, and articles most relevant to your audience. They can serve a variety of purposes such as increasing sales, raising awareness, educating the reader or disseminating information like announcements updates about your business or company. The possibilities are endless.

Why are  newsletters the perfect way for entrepreneurs to brand and market themselves?

If you’re an entrepreneur or someone who is building a personal brand, you are in the perfect position to humanize your work. You have an advantage over big name companies to create a core connection with your audience and make them the center of your story. This allows you to give value by creating customized tailored content that leaves an impact and impression with your readers. When it comes time to make the sale, you will have already established trust and connection with your audience through your newsletter. Who doesn’t want that?

While we’re on the topic, I’m not in love with the word ‘newsletter’. To me, it feels outdated, corporate jargon-y, and super spammy.  Would you click on a generic call-to-action link that reads: “Sign up to our newsletter to receive free updates and announcements!” Probs not.

I like sexier words like: Insider, Publication, Editorial, Happenings, or Guide.

I’ve written 284 “Guides” to date and there are a few things I have learned.

Decide on what you want to call your newsletters. Are they: newsletters, eMagazines, journals, etc. Decide on a name and stay true to it.

Content is key: Being clear on what your readers expect from you is essential. Decide what you want your newsletter to do. Remember it is just a vehicle for communicating with your audience. Do you want to inspire them, promote to them, teach them, update them...? Themes of your newsletter could be personal stories, industry news, blog post teaser, updates/announcements,

Keep it simple: When I work with clients to help them build their newsletters, my motto is always the same: Simplicity. From the overall design of the email, subject field,  to actual content. No more than two colors otherwise it becomes busy. Keep consistent fonts sizes and colors. If you’re hitting your 5th & 6th paragraph in your email, you’re on your way to creating a cluttered newsletter. If there is that much text  in your email, turn it into a blog.

Write in your authentic brand voice: If you are the face of your brand, be sure the text in your newsletter  captures your personality. In other words, write how you talk. If your newsletter is written on behalf of your company, you’ll need to clarify the essence words or personality type of your company and write from that perspective i.e. hip, trendy, informative, snarky, sarcastic, friendly, helpful etc.

Don’t just sell: Never ever ever use your newsletter to just sell to people. It’s gross and people can smell it a mile away. If your newsletter is purely promotional it will send people  away. I always follow the 80/20 rule; 80% content that is high value and relevant with no strings attached. This can be a personal story, case study, industry news, updates, quick tips/advice, etc. And 20% promotional copy, sales, etc.

Always leave a CTA (call-to-action): You always want to leave your reader with a next step, an action that flows seamlessly from the content they just read.  This can be an invitation to work with you, a link to read more on your blog, a link to company website to learn more, or some other resource. Again, simplicity is key so just a one or two liner invitation works fine.

Other things to note: Figure out how often you want to send out your newsletter. Weekly is popular but I’ve seen monthly, quarterly, and even daily newsletters as well. Figure out what works for you. Be realistic in what you can produce. Pick the right email provider platform suitable for your needs.  Mailchimp and Constant Contact are the most popular go-to providers. Stay consistent. Do this by creating an editorial calendar to keep you on track. I use my own home grown spreadsheet to track my newsletters but other options like Trello are also useful.

So off you go to build your own newsletter chock full of amazing content. Remember, personalization trumps all; there is another human on the other side who will be reading your newsletter so keep it people-centered and you can’t go wrong.

If you’re looking to grow your personal brand this year and need guidance that is both inspirational and practical, The Brand Revamp may be for you! Visit here to learn more about the program!

The Key To Writing An Authentic Professional Bio

Bios are the new resumes.

Whether for your personal website, a social media blurb, your company team page, or your pitch deck it is arguably the most important copy that you will ever write about yourself.  It is the number one thing you will be asked for by companies, conference organizers, or podcast hosts who are interested to work with you. Your bio is your top marketing asset; a place where you want people to not only get an accurate picture of you but a place to showcase your work, your personality, competence, and area of expertise.

Whatever opportunities you are pursuing right now, your bio is the one critical item you’ll need as part of your strategy.

When you write your bio, you’ll want to be sure that it is compelling, inspiring, and best of all, unforgettable.

No pressure, right?

Because your bio is that important, it is the most hardest thing for many of us to write. We would rather stick our heads in the sand than write about ourselves. So how do we come up with a document that takes the best parts of ourselves and distills it into something that potential clients, decision makers and influencers will clamor over?

It’s important to remember that people want to connect with real people and absent an actual face to face meeting, your digital mark is the one place people make their impressions of you. Your bio should contain four things: (1) Who you are, (2) What You do, (3) Why you do it, and (4) How.

Here’s a guide of what it would look like:

  1. Name, title, Who you help

  2. What you know or believe about the work you do - this is your ‘why’ statement. Should be inspiring and vision oriented.

  3. # of years in your field - this info is a great way to quickly show depth of experience. It helps the brain make a quick assessment of expertise.

  4. Compelling experiences and wins - this can include projects you’ve been involved with or client highlights

  5. Relevant trainings, certifications, awards received - this can include degrees, areas of study, universities attended.

  6. Contact - this info includes website, email, Linkedin profile, social media handles or any other ways people can find you on the internet.

Here’s an example:

Ariane Hunter is the CEO & Founder of Project She Went For Her Dreams; a personal branding & marketing firm in New York City and serving clients globally. She works with enlightened women and businesses to develop creative brands and build artistic marketing strategies to standout in a meaningful, authentic way.  Ariane believes in amplifying our voices at home and and work in order to impact our world and communities.

Ariane draws on decades of experience working for the top marketing and branding agencies in New York City and supporting high profile clients become key players in their industry. She holds an MBA and is a certified coach. Ariane has worked with industry leaders including Women in Stem Leadership at Stony Brook University, Women’s Catalyst group at HP, Oracle, and many more. She has spoken for NYU Stern Women in Business, Karen Millen, ABC Home, Emerging Leaders for NY Arts, and has been featured guest on numerous empowerment podcasts. Ariane is also a published writer whose work appears in Time.com, Levo League, Ivy Exec, and The Muse. She’s been quoted in The Daily Worth, Her Agenda, and more. You can learn more by visiting www.shewentforherdreams.com or contact via email: she@shewentforherdreams.com

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arianehunter/     | Instagram: @arianehunter

Your bio should not be too long; keep it succinct. Anything longer than two paragraphs or ten sentences starts to get too wordy. Keep in mind that your bio should evolve as you do. You may need to tweak it as you go along depending on your audience but now that you’ve got your draft down it will be easier to rework it.

This template is meant to be a guide but ultimately you get to decide how you word and craft your bio. It should make you feel proud and capture the essence of your work in an authentic way. Additionally, it will help you to be able to talk about your work more clearly and confidently.